Some service pros are employees, franchisees, dealers or independent contractors ("Corporate SP's") of larger national or "Corporate Accounts". When this is the case, you may be matched with the Corporate Account or with one of their Corporate service professionals. The above screening process is not applicable to Corporate Accounts, as HomeAdvisor does not screen Corporate Accounts or Corporate service professionals.
"Very happy to have hired Larry to repaint a bedroom in our house. He gave an honest and upfront quote based on the work needed, and he was eager to get started. He was very communicative throughout the entire process and always arrived on time. He's got a super positive attitude and should we have another project, we'll definitely be sure to call Larry! "
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I have no workman's comp or liability insuerance, so I charge a little less than the going rate (but not too much less). I an limited to working weekends and nights because of my day job. But otherwise, I try to be very flexible with all my customers. I also explain everything that I can to them about the process, and why certain steps should be taken.
HomeAdvisor uses an extensive screening process to screen businesses and business owners/principals. We perform this screening when a business applies to join our network and, if the business is accepted, once again every two years following — or whenever concerns are brought to our attention. If you have concerns that a pro in our network doesn't meet these standards, please contact us so we can investigate. We're committed to maintaining a network of trusted home service businesses, and those who don't meet our criteria will be rejected or promptly removed from our network.
Interior paint itself costs anywhere from $12-$50 or more a gallon, depending on the quality. Painting a 12x12-foot room, both walls and ceiling, can require $25-$100 worth of paint, plus $10-$50 for primer, brushes, rollers, drop clothes and other supplies. For a 1,500-square-foot home, supplies run $200-$300 for average paint, and $400-$600 for higher quality.
Whether doing it yourself or hiring someone, buy the best quality paint you can afford; it lasts longer and in some situations requires only one coat of paint instead of two. Painting a room usually involves prep work, primer and latex or alkyd paints with a range of finishes. HGTV.com gives a quick overview [1] as well as a list of painting dos and don'ts[2] .
With paint from the names you want, ProjectColor – our handy, easy-to-use paint app – and step-by-step DIY guides, The Home Depot can help make all your paint projects go smoothly from start to finish. So, get enough tarps to cover all your furniture and electronics and caulk to fix the cracks. We have everything you need to give your home a fresh coat of wall paint and keep it colorful inside and out. 
If you want to upgrade your home’s interior, or if you’re starting with a blank canvas, find a painter nearby so the project can go smoothly. Interior painting contractors and companies work hard to turn your house into a home. Hire a professional painter to add a fresh coat of paint on your walls, ceilings or window trim in any room in the house. Browse through the top-rated painters, read their customer reviews and ask for a cost estimate.
Tipping house painters is good etiquette. You can base the tip on the size of the crew, and request the amount to be evenly divided. Or, you can leave a tip based on the size of the job and leave it up to the foreman to decide how it is distributed among the crew. Sometimes — especially with big projects — the painters on the job change during the course of the project, so it’s often customary to leave one tip for the whole job.
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